When Guns are Outlawed, Only Outlaws will have Dry Spells

For it to be a news story, there has to be a little bit of death where death is unexpected: like children in First World suburbia. Retail death. But for death in Darkest Africa to make a news story, given the value of life in the Dark Continent, it has to be a batch process. Wholesale death.

Which brings us to the latest grim stop on the decades-long Stations of the Cross that is the history of independent Somalia, a history that comprises nothing uplifting —  just wars, civil wars, marginally-organized criminality, and death, death, death. So today’s news is just one fresh company-grade die-off in a nation that inflicts the Battle of the Somme on itself time and time again.

110 people have died from hunger in the past 48 hours in a single region as a severe drought threatens millions of people across the country.

It was the first death toll announced by Somalia’s government since it declared the drought a national disaster on Tuesday. The United Nations estimates that 5 million people in this Horn of Africa nation need aid, amid warnings of a full-blown famine.

Ah, yes. The poor Africans need aid. While this is certainly true, consider the history of passing that aid through the United Nations and other transgovernmental and non-governmental organizations. Seventy years of doing that has built many a bank skyscraper in Geneva and Liège. And the Africans are still pretty much as poor as Stanley or Livingstone ever found ’em.

Prime Minister Hassan Ali Khaire spoke during a meeting with the Somali National Drought Committee. The death toll he announced is from the Bay region in the southwest part of the country alone. Somalia was one of four regions singled out by the U.N. secretary-general last month in a $4.4 billion aid appeal to avert catastrophic hunger and famine, along with northeast Nigeria, South Sudan and Yemen. All are connected by a thread of violent conflict, the U.N. chief said.

$4.4 Billion, of which most will go to provide Good Jobs at Good Wages for UN bureaucrats… in places like New York and Geneva.

The U.N. humanitarian coordinator, Stephen O’Brien, was expected to visit Somalia in the next few days.

How did any humanitarian actions take place before the Event Horizon of humanitarian coordinators?

Bonus question: suggest the lowest probable annual income and net worth for the above-mentioned Stephen O’Brien. Express your answer in multiples of the annual per-capita GDP for Somalia.

Thousands have been streaming into Somalia’s capital, Mogadishu, in search of food aid, overwhelming local and international aid agencies. Over 7,000 internally displaced people checked into one feeding center recently.

“Feeding center.” Jeez, 1984 is here at last. Or maybe it’s Brave New World. 

The drought is the first crisis for Somalia’s newly elected Somali-American leader, President Mohamed Abdullahi Mohamed. Previous droughts and a quarter-century of conflict, including ongoing attacks by extremist group al-Shabab, have left the country fragile. Mohamed has appealed to the international community and Somalia’s diaspora of 2 million people for help.

What kind of help?

Is it just us, or does it sound like Dueling Mohameds here has his hand out for money?

About 363,000 acutely malnourished children in Somalia “need urgent treatment and nutrition support, including 71,000 who are severely malnourished,” the U.S. Agency for International Development’s Famine Early Warning Systems Network has warned.

Because of a lack of clean water in many areas, there is the additional threat of cholera and other diseases, U.N. experts say. Some deaths from cholera already have been reported.

Experts. Where would we be without them?

The government has said the widespread hunger “makes people vulnerable to exploitation, human rights abuses and to criminal and terrorist networks.”

The U.N. humanitarian appeal for 2017 for Somalia is $864 million to provide assistance to 3.9 million people. But the U.N. World Food Program recently requested an additional $26 million plan to respond to the drought.

via Somalia: 110 dead from hunger in past 48 hours in drought | Minnesota Public Radio News.

What percentage of that total $890 million will go to feed those 3.9 million people, and what percentage of it will be stacked up like gold teeth in the safekeeping of the gnomes of Zurich, on the personal accounts of various African politicians and UN/international doo-gooders,  is another question entirely.

39 thoughts on “When Guns are Outlawed, Only Outlaws will have Dry Spells

  1. Josey Wales

    I just love it when you write like this…..it reinforces (among other things) my belief that the UN is a fucking stain on humanity…..

  2. Old Whore

    I have seen (personally studied and observed) case after case where exactly zero percent of big aid packages made it to the ostensibly intended recipients.

    There is going to be a day of reckoning.

  3. Alan Ward

    I took the better half to Paris for our 25th. Our hotel was just across the street from the complex where the lower echelons of the UNESCO organisation were housed. Watching these minor functionaries and there families for that week further influenced my disdain for most things UN.
    No wonder they keep asking for more aid each time there is a crisis. Got to keep the Pettit bourgeois in baguettes and pâtés.

  4. S

    The olive wreath on the UN flag…..it represents ruling, not peace. Why is it a perspective from the north? Far fetched, perhaps, but still:

    Isaiah 14:12-15 AV
    [12] How art thou fallen from heaven, O Lucifer, son of the morning! how art thou cut down to the ground, which didst weaken the nations!
    [13] For thou hast said in thine heart, I will ascend into heaven, I will exalt my throne above the stars of God: I will sit also upon the mount of the congregation, in the sides of the north:
    [14] I will ascend above the heights of the clouds; I will be like the most High.
    [15] Yet thou shalt be brought down to hell, to the sides of the pit.

    Is it strange they do only evil?

  5. Y.

    Ah, yes. The poor Africans need aid. While this is certainly true, consider the history of passing that aid through the United Nations and other transgovernmental and non-governmental organizations. Seventy years of doing that has built many a bank skyscraper in Geneva and Liège. And the Africans are still pretty much as poor as Stanley or Livingstone ever found ’em.

    Don’t be a fucking idiot, please. Lot of Americans are doing that, no need to emulate them.
    There is at least 10x more Africans now than in the year 1900. And more and more each year.

    1. 2hotel9

      And whose fault is that? Why are they poor? Why can they not feed themselves? Why do they keep stumbling all over themselves to embrace socialism? You can not help people who refuse to help themselves. Hell, refuse? They actively do sh*t to make their situation worse, so how about you don’t be a fucking idiot.

    2. 2hotel9

      And whose fault is that? Why are they poor? Why can they not feed themselves? Why do they keep stumbling all over themselves to embrace socialism? You can not help people who refuse to help themselves. Hell, refuse? They actively do sh*t to make their situation worse, so how about you don’t be a fucking idiot.

    3. DaveP.

      I agree with you that the Africans aren’t any more responsible for themselves or capable of taking care of themselves than they were in the year 1900.

  6. 2hotel9

    Got to go all Sam on this, they live in a f*cking desert! Somalia has ALWAYS been a desert with very small regions where actual agriculture can be sustained. Add to this mix that muslim f*ckbags keep DESTROYING crops that actually do grow, kill anyone who can actually work said crops and drive the children and women into camps and slums in which these same muslim f*ckbags constantly rape, sodomize, torture, starve and murder them. All while screeching at everyone else that they want “aid”. And all this is somehow “my” fault?

    1. staghounds

      Images of starving people are the #1 value export commodity in lots of places.

      Hungry, pathetic people are like an aid money seed crop, it’s in the tyrants’ interest to have plenty of them.

  7. A Scot in Sweden

    An excellently written article, Hognose, whose topic matches perfectly with your acerbic style.
    Appreciated!
    It’s interesting, don’t you think, how this topic has divided our western world into those who have cottoned on (do you Americans say this?) and see our aid and development initiatives for what they now are, and those others who are wilfully ignorant of the actual consequences of these initiatives.
    In my job (I’m a teacher) I frequently have to bite my tongue as new appeals for aid are launched to our innocent pupils; it sometimes seems as if the end point of our schooling is to ensure our pupils have a sufficiently large dose of third world guilt to crush any resistance they may have to such appeals. This process goes by the name of ‘creating a global citizen.’
    It would not surprise me if the particular situation you refer to will turn up as a fresh appeal in my school. I would love to read your article out loud to the assembly beforehand. But after this fantasy satisfaction, things would not go well for me in real life.
    Reading your blog has been a tonic. Among other pleasures, it has made me realise that there are very many of us real world realists who, of necessity, had been flying under the radar. Your article though contributes to what I think is a changing climate. Perhaps soon we can climb to attack height.

    Thanks again.

    1. Hognose Post author

      Thanks, Scotsman. Your appreciation is appreciated, and the difficulty of your position is clear.

      A handout rather than an earn-out seems as toxic to the soul of a nation as it is to the soul of a man.

    2. Mike_C

      What age/level of education do you teach, Mr Scot? If young ones, do they come to school preloaded-by-family with globalism? (And what is the breakdown of Svensk, general “Nordsk” and non-Nordic immigrants?) If at the college level, do you see attitude differences between STEM vs liberal arts types?

      >have cottoned on (do you Americans say this?)
      The expression is known to Americans (at least to this one), but using the word “cotton” in a discussion that involves African Americans* is triggering and racist. I’m not being facetious either. (Well, that’s a lie, I think it’s arrant nonsense, but the truth is that plenty of highly-educated useful idiots, and plenty of community activist types, would be happy to persecute-and-prosecute you, ensure you are fired from your job, regardless of the official findings, and blacklisted. Oh, damn that inherent racism in English vernacular expressions — racist, racist, racist!) This is the kind of minefield one navigates daily in political, academic, and increasingly, ordinary public life in these United States.

      *AA: never mind we’re talking about Somalis who live in Africa and are Somali, not American, and never mind that vanishingly few if any Somalis were ever enslaved in the US.

      > after this fantasy satisfaction, things would not go well for me in real life.
      No kidding, not in education. One of the areas where I am professionally active is very data and outcomes driven. There is little political correctness there (the implanted medical device worked, or it didn’t). Another area, epidemiology, is essentially nothing BUT data. Yet strangely enough, I have seen epi become more and more agenda rather than data driven. (Because epi is used, or abused, for public policy.) The prevalent terminology used itself frames the thinking. As but one example, differences, especially differences in outcomes between ethnic groups, is almost always (95%+) phrased using the loaded term “disparities” rather than the more neutral, descriptive term “differences” — and so forth.

      >realize there are very many of us real world realists who, of necessity, had been flying under the radar
      I think this is also one of the positive consequences of the Trumpening, at least in the US.

  8. Nick

    Easy fix, just say no to funding until you get your act together.
    When I say “YOU”,I’m talking about the administration of the UN.

    1. Larry Kaiser

      It always amazes me that the same people who understand very well how compound interest rates work will not understand that a country with a very high reproduction rate is going to be in trouble sooner or later. It would take a great deal of aide to keep Somalis in cornmeal if they somehow managed to limit their population to the current numbers. With a 4 or 5 % growth rate it will be impossible. Population pressure has led to desertification which makes it more difficult to raise enough food. Countries whose prevailing religions teach that it is ones religious duty to breed like rats are all going to face famine at some time, now or later. In order to relieve these pressures the Western world would have to take in around 50 million refugees per year. I realize that our grocery stores are full of food and that obesity is a serious problem. That is now. Our current agricultural system is unsustainable in the long run. In many areas we are using ground water faster than it is being replaced. Top soil is going away faster than it is being produced.
      I know that to be considered a real conservative I am supposed to think that all growth is good and the more people we have in the US the better off we will be. As a gun owner and hunter I think that is bullshit. When we take in millions of emigrants from countries where only the bad guys have guns we are just that much closer to losing our gun rights. Don’t get me started about places to hunt or shoot.

      1. Hognose Post author

        Well if current trends continue, the whole world will be a place to hunt and shoot, but the only game will be homo sapiens.

        1. Chris W.

          I wish we could get on with it already. I know it will be horrible beyond comprehension, but I don’t want to try to live through it when I’m 70. It’s definitely coming.

      2. whomever

        “It always amazes me that the same people who understand very well how compound interest rates work will not understand that a country with a very high reproduction rate is going to be in trouble sooner or later.”

        Actually, it’s all exponential growth whether the reproduction rate is high or low, as long as it’s above zero. I think the current US growth rate has the population doubling every 70 years or so. We’re making an implicit gamble that technology will progress rapidly enough to support that rise. That’s certainly been true for the last century or so, but technological advancement isn’t something you can reliably schedule in advance.

        That’s aside from the question of ‘in 70 years, will an America with a population of 600 million be a better or worse place to live?’.

        1. 11b-mailclerk

          Curveball:

          Humans create Net-new resources.

          Green revolution in crops.

          Asteroid mining when we need it.

          As long as something resembling a market exists, some greedy slug will figure out how to sell buckets of stuff needed.

        2. bloke_from_ohio

          Malthus was wrong in 1798. His ideas did not get less wrong in the intervening 219 years no matter how many times they are revived. I supposed it just goes to show how powerful an appeal to pessimism can be.

      3. John M.

        Someone should tell the Israelis that the Holy Land won’t hold all those Jewish settlers. The land was at its max carrying capacity in 1917.

        -John M.

  9. Fuel Filter.

    “Feed and clothe the hungry people of Africa. They need your help. We appeal to your guilt-ridden Christian conscience.”

    And so the do-gooders and the virtue-signaling ASPCA-for-African-Children will dig deep into *YOUR* wallets and purses to increase the flood of die-veracity into Western nations ‘cuz there is no more water and food “for them in the inn”.

    We keep trying to throw Darwin off his throne but, in the long term, math always has the final say.

    You cannot treat the gentleman and the savage as equals without consequences.

    And so the “Camp of the Saints” goes marching on.

  10. Why

    “You cannot treat the gentleman and the savage as equals without consequences.”

    QOTD

  11. Winston Smith

    If you want to really help them, send them some birth control. That’s the core problem.
    Well, aside from trying to live in a fucking desert.

    1. staghounds

      The UN does a GREAT DEAL of this. Year before last the UNFPA bought and distributed over a BILLION condoms, and lord knows how many other birth control things.

      I know because I know the person who did the logistics. I am no great fan of the UN, but UNFPA is a worth while program that DOES understand compound expenses.

      http://www.unfpa.org/

  12. Aesop

    Dr. Kinison’s response shared above has been my starting and ending thought on the matter since about 2 seconds after he did the bit.
    But until he finds his way here, now that he’s back to blogging again, let me humbly add on Kim DuToit’s behalf the always apt aphorism “Africa wins again.”
    And further note a la Reagan that what you subsidize, you get more of.

    1. John M.

      Ethiopia, the main point of “We Are the World”, isn’t a desert. At least not mainly. The main cause of Ethiopia’s family, as usual for the 20th century, was communism.

      -John M.

      1. John M.

        Make that read “Ethiopia’s famine,” not “Ethiopia’s family.”

        -John M.

  13. A Scot in Sweden

    Hognose, I’m back with a response to one of your readers.

    Mike, C, to answer your questions:

    I work with primary age children. They are mainly of European origin (this caveat may be important). The younger ones display no pre-existing attitude to charity and, I believe, are not yet capable of feeling guilt. However, what younger children lack in understanding or caring about an issue (charity, in this case) they make up in guile and instinctive reading of adults’ intentions. They intuitively know that they are not really being invited to consider whether they wish to care for and/or support a cause, but are tacitly being told to. Naturally, seeking the adult’s approval (in this case, the teacher) they usually appear to enthusiastically embrace the causes presented to them. Thus do we make them little hypocrites, without them even knowing they are.
    Certainly, by upper primary age, most children have ‘chapter and verse’ correct responses to the various social justice, charity and global issues presented to them. In this respect they reflect perfectly the prevailing attitudes of most of the (mostly female) staff; in my case, myself excepted, exclusively female staff! I really would quickly identify myself as ‘other’ if I was to try to introduce a little real world cynicism in these issues. Perhaps I am a little paranoid about this, but I do believe that the Twitterscape is out there, hovering, waiting on someone like me outing myself.
    Perhaps, all is not lost though. History’s big wheel turns and some other idea has its place in the sun. And, as I alluded, Hognose’s fabulously jaundiced (and erudite) articles play a part in this. Too, we must hope that when these propagandised youngsters become teenagers and rebels, they could flip en masse to the dark side. I mean, how many times do you have to support starving Africans or sponsor women learning to swim in Bangladesh (drowning apparently is a major source of female mortality) before you just don’t care any more?
    Mike, I agree with your point on Trump. He has been a catalyst worldwide. Perhaps even more; a kind of prophet maybe? You should have seen the faces in the staffroom after his victory, and we’re not even Americans! You would think he had personally fired them all and withdrew pension rights. I couldn’t look up, I knew my colleagues would see my eyes and ‘know.’
    I was not aware of the potential racialist overtones of ‘cotton on.’ Who would’ve thought that a common phrase could undo you. So thanks for that heads up. Oh, to live an undefended life.
    Best wishes

    1. Mike_C

      Tack, Herr Scotte.
      >the potential racialist overtones of ‘cotton on.’
      To be fair, it takes a fairly deranged leftist whacko to find racism in that expression. That said, we have a definite oversupply of deranged leftist whackos.

      >my colleagues would see my eyes and ‘know.’
      This very issue has been remarked on by others in similar situations. It’s ironic that the very people who claim to be oppressed by “cis-het patriarchy” (or whatever) have become the oppressors in much of the West.

  14. A Scot in Sweden

    I am not meaning this to be a post (although you can consider it so if you wish). This idea came to mind, alas, after I posted.
    Hognose,
    It was not my intention at all to be facetious, far less to insult you, when I mentioned your posts as sometimes being jaundiced. I was intending it as a robust compliment. I hope you thought of it this way. And apologies if you misunderstood my intent.
    This style of communication sometimes lends itself to misunderstanding and bad manners. Sorry.

  15. A Scot in Sweden

    (Hognose, the reply I was referring to in my last post seemed to have disappeared when I sent it. Here it is again. Of course, it is now out of sequence…sorry)

    Hognose, I’m back with a response to one of your readers.

    Mike, C, to answer your questions:

    I work with primary age children. They are mainly of European origin (this caveat may be important). The younger ones display no pre-existing attitude to charity and, I believe, are not yet capable of feeling guilt. However, what younger children lack in understanding or caring about an issue (charity, in this case) they make up in guile and instinctive reading of adults’ intentions. They intuitively know that they are not really being invited to consider whether they wish to care for and/or support a cause, but are tacitly being told to. Naturally, seeking the adult’s approval (in this case, the teacher) they usually appear to enthusiastically embrace the causes presented to them. Thus do we make them little hypocrites, without them even knowing they are.
    Certainly, by upper primary age, most children have ‘chapter and verse’ correct responses to the various social justice, charity and global issues presented to them. In this respect they reflect perfectly the prevailing attitudes of most of the (mostly female) staff; in my case, myself excepted, exclusively female staff! I really would quickly identify myself as ‘other’ if I was to try to introduce a little real world cynicism into these issues. Perhaps I am a little paranoid about this, but I do believe that the Twitterscape is out there, hovering, waiting on someone like me outing myself.
    Perhaps, all is not lost though. History’s big wheel turns and some other idea has its place in the sun. And, as I alluded, Hognose’s fabulously jaundiced (and erudite) articles play a part in this. Too, we must hope that when these propagandised youngsters become teenagers and rebels, they could flip en masse to the dark side. I mean, how many times do you have to support starving Africans or sponsor women learning to swim in Bangladesh (drowning apparently is a major source of female mortality) before you just don’t care any more?
    Mike, I agree with your point on Trump. He has been a catalyst worldwide. Perhaps even more; a kind of prophet maybe? You should have seen the faces in the staffroom after his victory, and we’re not even Americans! You would think he had personally fired them all and withdrew pension rights. I couldn’t look up, I knew my colleagues would see my eyes and ‘know.’
    I was not aware of the potential racialist overtones of ‘cotton on.’ Who would’ve thought that a common phrase could undo you. So thanks for that heads up. Oh, to live an undefended life.
    Best wishes

  16. A Scot in Sweden

    (Hognose, the reply I was referring to in my last post seemed to have disappeared when I sent it. Here it is again. Of course, it is now out of sequence…sorry)

    Hognose, I’m back with a response to one of your readers.
    Mike, C, to answer your questions:
    I work with primary age children. They are mainly of European origin (this caveat may be important). The younger ones display no pre-existing attitude to charity and, I believe, are not yet capable of feeling guilt. However, what younger children lack in understanding or caring about an issue (charity, in this case) they make up in guile and instinctive reading of adults’ intentions. They intuitively know that they are not really being invited to consider whether they wish to care for and/or support a cause, but are tacitly being told to. Naturally, seeking the adult’s approval (in this case, the teacher) they usually appear to enthusiastically embrace the causes presented to them. Thus do we make them little hypocrites, without them even knowing they are.
    Certainly, by upper primary age, most children have ‘chapter and verse’ correct responses to the various social justice, charity and global issues presented to them. In this respect they reflect perfectly the prevailing attitudes of most of the (mostly female) staff; in my case, myself excepted, exclusively female staff! I really would quickly identify myself as ‘other’ if I was to try to introduce a little real world cynicism in these issues. Perhaps I am a little paranoid about this, but I do believe that the Twitterscape is out there, hovering, waiting on someone like me outing myself.
    Perhaps, all is not lost though. History’s big wheel turns and some other idea has its place in the sun. And, as I alluded, Hognose’s fabulously jaundiced (and erudite) articles play a part in this. Too, we must hope that when these propagandised youngsters become teenagers and rebels, they could flip en masse to the dark side. I mean, how many times do you have to support starving Africans or sponsor women learning to swim in Bangladesh (drowning apparently is a major source of female mortality) before you just don’t care any more?
    Mike, I agree with your point on Trump. He has been a catalyst worldwide. Perhaps even more; a kind of prophet maybe? You should have seen the faces in the staffroom after his victory, and we’re not even Americans! You would think he had personally fired them all and withdrew pension rights. I couldn’t look up, I knew my colleagues would see my eyes and know.
    I was not aware of the potential racialist overtones of ‘cotton on.’ Who would’ve thought that a common phrase could undo you. So thanks for that heads up. Oh, to live an undefended life.
    Best wishes

  17. Docduracoat

    The last famine in Somalia was when Al Shabab still held a lot of territory
    They refused to let the food agencies deliver food to the people under their control
    The food was used by the radical Islamic fundamentalist fighters of Al Shabab
    Of course the people were also prevented from fleeing to the feeding centers

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